Let Me Tell You This

'Nadine Aisha Jassat’s Let Me Tell You This (404 Ink) is a punchy, powerful debut collection that investigates what it means to be of dual heritage. The poems capture with real panache the secret lives of women, and they’re poignant, too.'

- Jackie Kay, The Guardian: Best Books of 2018

Image Credit: Chris Scott Photography 

Shortlisted for the Edwin Morgan Poetry Award 2018 // Waterstones // Foyles // 404 Ink

Nadine Aisha Jassat’s debut poetry collection Let Me Tell You This is a vital exploration of racism, gender-based violence and the sustaining, restorative bonds between women, told with her searing precision and lyricism.

Nadine takes you on a journey exploring heritage, connection, and speaking out. These poems demonstrate the power of heart and voice, and will stay with readers long after the last page is turned.

'An important collection of poems, incisive, delicate, and precise... Jassat is unflinching as she delivers lyrical gut punches that stay with you for days.' - Nikesh Shukla, The One Who Wrote Destiny

'I adore the wise yet searching words of Nadine Aisha Jassat.' - Sabrina Mahfouz, How You Might Know Me

'A joy both live and on the page. I love the way Nadine plays with voice and layering in her poetry.' - Hollie McNish, Nobody Told Me 

'Jassat's poems crackle with anger and joy, unafraid to take on complex subjects or to revel in the raw simplicity of emotion. It's rare that a debut poetry collection feels this assured.' DIVA Magazine

'Nadine is a writer of extraordinary talent whose graceful, honest words somehow hit you with all the force of a sucker punch. I felt read by this collection... If you read one poetry collection this year, let it be this. ' - Sabeena Akhtar, Cut from the Same Cloth 

'Let Me Tell You This marks a brilliant addition to Scotland's poetry landscape... A reclamation of the right to speak burns urgently at its core... A musicality sings from the pages as does a playful fondness for rhyme, crafting a charming intertextual cohesion.

 

The debut offers a fine display of 'how to make something beautiful / something useful, from tangled yarn / and threads', embracing rather than seeking to conceal the chaos and contradiction of identity with all its loose, unruly strands.'

- The List Magazine, February 2019 

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